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Americana Furniture and Interiors
Pre-owned Kittinger Furniture, Kindel Furniture, Baker Furniture and Saybolt-Cleland Furniture

History

KittingerFurnitureTableCW88

FURNITURE HISTORY

Kittinger Furniture, Kindel Furniture, Baker Furniture and Saybolt-Cleland Furniture, Colonial Williamsburg and Museum Reproduction Programs

Recreating a living tradition for future generations is the hallmark of all great Museum Reproduction Programs. To insure that reproductions “truly reproduce” the great styles and decoration of the American tradition, only manufacturers whose experience and ability meet the highest standards are licensed for these programs.

We are proud to offer the finest selection of vintage Kittinger furniture, Kindel furniture, Baker furniture and Saybolt-Cleland furniture licensed reproductions.

Kittinger Furniture

With its already long established tradition in producing fine furniture, Kittinger Furniture was licensed by Colonial Williamsburg to reproduce and adapt pieces for its collection from the Program's inception in 1937 to 1990. During this period, Kittinger Furniture reproduced more than 200 pieces for Colonial Williamsburg.

In addition to the Williamsburg Collection, Kittinger Furniture was licensed to be the exclusive maker of Historic Newport Reproductions featuring works by Newport’s Goddard and Townsend cabinetmakers.

Other Kittinger furniture licensed reproductions include the finest antiques from: The Baleroy Collection, a private Philadelphia collection with original antiques dating from 1740-1760; Independence Hall Reproductions and Historic Savannah Reproductions, depicting the rich heritage of regional furniture.

In 1974, the Biggs Furniture Company of Richmond, Virginia was acquired by the Kittinger Furniture Company and it became the Biggs Division of Kittinger. The Biggs Division was licensed to produce the Old Dominion Collection, Old Sturbridge Village Collection and Thomas Jefferson Furniture Reproductions. These collections included an extensive collection of important pieces of Americana from early country furniture to beautifully developed Queen Anne and Rococo furniture.

Kindel Furniture

The Kindel Furniture Company, meeting a high standard of excellence in craftsmanship, was licensed by the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum. Widely heralded for the importance of its collection, Winterthur's Reproduction Program focuses on furniture from 1740 to 1815, considered "The Golden Age of American Design." Kindel Furniture has reproduced these fine antiques since 1980, including some of the most sophisticated Philadelphia and Newport pieces in the Winterthur collection.

In 1986, The National Trust for Historic Preservation embarked on a Reproduction Program to include what is considered some of the finest pieces in its collection. Looking for the highest standard in quality, the Kindel Furniture Company was licensed to produce a limited number of each selected piece in the Reproduction Program. The furniture chosen came from National Trust properties including Cliveden, Oatlands, Wilson House, Woodlawn, and Belle Grove Plantation.

Licensed by the Irish Georgian Society in 1984, Kindel furniture reproductions for this program include more than twenty "best-of-kind" examples.

Baker Furniture

During the 1990's, the Baker Furniture Company was selected by Colonial Williamsburg to continue its Reproduction Program. With its years of experience and quality craftsmanship, Baker furniture was already well respected for its furniture made under license to the Historic Charleston Foundation, and continued this tradition for Colonial Williamsburg.

Baker Furniture is also well known for its Stately Homes Collection, reproducing important antiques from English, Scottish and Irish Manor Houses.

Saybolt & Cleland, Inc.

Renowned for its unsurpassed quality, Saybolt & Cleland, Inc. made reproduction furniture in Philadelphia for over forty years, 1933 to the mid 1970's. They specialized in faithfully reproducing the finest American and English antiques from museums, historic homes and private collections. Their clientele included Fortune 500 Companies, State and Federal offices as well as private individuals.

 

Williamsburg Accessories

ACCESSORIES HISTORY

Virginia Metalcrafters, Lester H. Berry, Inc., The Stieff Company, and Blenko Glass Company, Colonial Williamsburg and Museum Reproduction Programs.

Virginia Metalcrafters

Established in 1890, Virginia Metalcrafters was recognized by numerous museums and restorations for its high standard of quality craftsmanship and fine design and was selected to reproduce accessory pieces from America's foremost historic sites. Virginia Metalcrafters began its licensing program with Colonial Williamsburg in 1951. The program grew to include: Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, Historic Newport, Old Salem, George Washington's Mount Vernon, Historic Charleston, Old Sturbridge Village, Mystic Seaport and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These collections include a wide range of distinctive accessories.

Lester H. Berry, Inc.

Considered the "Dean of American Reproduction Lighting," for more than 70 years, Lester H. Berry, Inc., crafted only the finest lighting fixtures in the 18th Century tradition. Examples of pieces from Lester Berry were sought out by prominent institutions including the Smithsonian. These pieces can also be found in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms at the State Department, The White House and Blair House.

The Stieff Company

Founded in 1892, The Stieff Company was one of the most important manufacturers in the United States and the largest manufacturer of silver objects. Second to none in quality and integrity, it was selected by Williamsburg Restoration, Inc., in 1940, early in the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg, to reproduce silver and pewter pieces from the Williamsburg Collection.

Blenko Glass Company

Originally founded in 1893 as a sheet glass company, Blenko Glass Company's early successes included providing glass for the stained glass windows of St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City. In 1930, the business expanded to include the production of hand-blown stemware and tableware. The fine quality of Blenko was immediately recognized by Colonial Williamsburg and Blenko was licensed as exclusive glass manufacturer and remained as such until 1966. Over the years, Blenko achieved much critical acclaim and received the Museum of Modern Art's Good Design Award.

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